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Haglund's Deformity and Marines

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  • Haglund's Deformity and Marines

    Hey guys, I'm Sean, new on this forum. I am a green card holder that has always wanted to join the Marines but there are an obstacle or two in my way. I have a minor condition called Haglunds Deformity 'pump bump' which is a small bump on the back of one of my heels. it does not hurt one bit and i do a lot of physical training. I was just wondering is 'Pump Bump' disqualifying? there is surgery but thats only for people with really bad 'pump bump'. please let me go guys IM ALMOST THERE!!

  • #2
    I have never really heard of this condition. If it doesn't hamper your running or anything I don't think it should be a problem. But then again anytime the word "deformity" comes up in a diagnosis Im sure it will scare some recruiters away.

    The best coarse of action is to get notes from your Dr saying that it won't compromise your ability to run, get worse or prohibit you from doing your job. Getting all that information for your recruiter before you even walk in the door, as well as scoring high on the ASVAB, will increase your chances of getting cleared.

    Comment


    • #3
      Although.. I did find these rules in the Standards of Medical Fitness.

      Lower extremities

      a. Limitation of motion.

      Current joint ranges of motion less than the measurements listed in paragraphs below do not
      meet the standard.

      (1) Hip (due to disease (726.5), or injury (905.2)):
      (a)
      Flexion to 90 degrees.
      (b)
      No demonstrable flexion contracture.
      (c)
      Extension to 10 degrees (beyond 0 degrees).
      (d)
      Abduction to 45 degrees.
      (e)
      Rotation of 60 degrees (internal and external combined).
      (2) Knee (due to disease (726.6), or injury (905.4)):
      (a)
      Full extension to 0 degrees.
      (b)
      Flexion to 110 degrees.
      (3) Ankle (due to disease (726.7), or injury (905.4) or congenital defect):
      (a)
      Dorsiflexion to 10 degrees.
      (b)
      Planter flexion to 30 degrees.
      (4) Subtalar eversion and inversion totaling 5 degrees (due to disease (726.7) or injury (905.4) or congenital defect).

      b. Foot and ankle.
      (1) Current absence of a foot or any portion thereof (896) does not meet the standard.
      (2) Current or history of deformities of the toes (acquired (735) or congenital (755.66)) including, but not limited to
      conditions such as hallux valgus (735.0), hallux varus (735.1), hallux rigidicus (735.2), hammer toe(s) (735.4), claw
      toe(s) (735.5), overriding toe(s) (735.8), that prevents the proper wearing of military footwear or impairs walking,
      marching, running, or jumping, do not meet the standard.
      (3) Current or history of clubfoot (754.70) or pes cavus (754.71) that prevents the proper wearing of military
      footwear or impairs walking, marching, running, or jumping does not meet the standard.
      (4) Current symptomatic pes planus (acquired (734) or congenital (754.6)) or history of pes planus corrected by
      prescription or custom orthotics does not meet the standard.
      (5) Current ingrown toenails (703.0), if infected or symptomatic, do not meet the standard.
      (6) Current plantar fasciitis (728.71) does not meet the standard.
      (7) Current neuroma (355.6) that is refractory to medical treatment, or impairs walking, marching, running, or
      jumping, or prevents the proper wearing of military footwear, does not meet the standard.

      c. Leg, knee, thigh, and hip.
      (1) Current loose or foreign body within the knee joint (717.6) does not meet the standard.
      (2) History of uncorrected anterior (717.83) or posterior (717.84) cruciate ligament injury does not meet the
      standard. History of surgical correction of knee ligaments does not meet the standard only if symptomatic or unstable
      (P81.4).
      (3) Current symptomatic medial and lateral collateral ligament injury does not meet the standard.
      (4) Current symptomatic medial and lateral meniscal injury does not meet the standard.
      (5) Current unspecified internal derangement of the knee (717.9) does not meet the standard.
      (6) Current or history of congenital dislocation of the hip (754.3), osteochondritis of the hip (Legg-Perthes disease)
      (732.1), or slipped femoral epiphysis of the hip (732.2) does not meet the standard.
      (7) Current or history of hip dislocation (835) within 2 years preceding examination does not meet the standard.
      (8) Current osteochondritis of the tibial tuberosity (Osgood-Schlatter disease) (732.4), does not meet the standard if
      symptomatic.

      d. General.
      (1) Current deformities, disease, or chronic joint pain of pelvic region, thigh (719.45), lower leg (719.46), ankle and/
      or foot (719.47) that have interfered with function to such a degree as to prevent the individual from following a
      physically active vocation in civilian life, or that would interfere with walking, running, weight bearing, or the
      satisfactory completion of training or military duty, do not meet the standard.
      (2) Current leg-length discrepancy resulting in a limp (736.81) does not meet the standard.
      (See also para 211.)

      Miscellaneous conditions of the extremities
      a.
      Current or history of chondromalacia (717.7), including, but not limited to chronic patello-femoral pain syndrome
      and retro-patellar pain syndrome, chronic osteoarthritis (715.3) or traumatic arthritis (716.1) does not meet the standard.
      b.
      Current joint dislocation if unreduced, or history of recurrent dislocations of any major joint such as shoulder
      (831), hip (835), elbow (832), knee (836), ankle (837), or instability of any major joint (shoulder (718.81), elbow (718.
      7
      AR 40501 14 December 2007/RAR 23 August 2010
      82), hip (718.85), ankle and foot (718.87) or multiple sites (718.89)) does not meet the standard. History of recurrent
      instability of the knee or shoulder does not meet the standard.
      c.
      Current or history of chronic osteoarthritis (715.3) or traumatic arthritis (716.1) of isolated joints of more than a
      minimal degree that has interfered with the following of a physically active vocation in civilian life, or that prevents
      the satisfactory performance of military duty does not meet the standard.
      d.
      Fractures.
      (1) Current malunion or non-union of any fracture (733.8) (except asymptomatic ulnar styloid process fracture) does
      not meet the standard.
      (2) Current retained hardware that is symptomatic, interferes with proper wearing of protective equipment or
      military uniform, and/or is subject to easy trauma, does not meet the standard (V53.7). Retained hardware (733.99)
      (including plates, pins, rods, wires, or screws used for fixation) is not disqualifying if fractures are healed, ligaments
      are stable, there is no pain, and it is not subject to easy trauma.
      e.
      Current devices, including, but not limited to silastic or titanium, implanted to correct orthopedic abnormalities
      (V43), do not meet the standard.
      f.
      Current or history of contusion of bone or joint; an injury of more than a minor nature that will interfere or
      prevent performance of military duty, or will require frequent or prolonged treatment without fracture nerve injury,
      open wound, crush or dislocation, which occurred within the preceding 6 weeks (upper extremity (923), lower
      extremity (924), ribs and clavicle (922)) does not meet the standard.
      g.
      History of joint replacement (V43.6) of any site does not meet the standard.
      h.
      Current or history of muscular paralysis, contracture, or atrophy (728), if progressive or of sufficient degree to
      interfere with or prevent satisfactory performance of military duty or if it will require frequent or prolonged treatment,
      does not meet the standard.
      i.
      Current osteochondritis dessicans (732.7) does not meet the standard.
      j.
      Current or history of osteochondromatosis or multiple cartilaginous exostoses (727.82) do not meet the standard.
      k.
      Current osteoporosis (733) does not meet the standard.
      l.
      Current osteomyelitis (730), or history of recurrent osteomyelitis does not meet the standard

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by BootCamp4Me View Post
        I have never really heard of this condition. If it doesn't hamper your running or anything I don't think it should be a problem. But then again anytime the word "deformity" comes up in a diagnosis Im sure it will scare some recruiters away.

        The best coarse of action is to get notes from your Dr saying that it won't compromise your ability to run, get worse or prohibit you from doing your job. Getting all that information for your recruiter before you even walk in the door, as well as scoring high on the ASVAB, will increase your chances of getting cleared.
        Thank you for the reply!! Almost no one replays to this question on forums I go on to. If you look it up its basically just a bump. It does not affect my training. I did a 20 km ruck march a few months ago and absolutely no problems. I'm just scared of being p'dq over this bs. The military has been there for me always and I have a massive military family. I'm just hoping oh and I read the standards and it doesn't limit my motion or anything I can still run 10k's with no pain. Thank you for the input though!! I need all I can get at this point

        Comment


        • #5
          Oh and there is a surgery for it. Would you recommend it? It leaves an inch of scar tissue on your heel and the bump will then be permanently gone let me know what you think

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